SHARING MEMORIES, WEEK TWENTY-EIGHT

Describe Business Places 100 Years Ago

By Howard Morton Brown

Carleton Place Canadian, 16 May, 1963

 

Start of High Street

On the Perth road, now High Street, a dozen of the village’s buildings of 1863 extended from Bridge Street along the north side of the road for a distance of about two blocks.  There was only one building on its south side, the large stone house torn down several years ago, at the corner of Water Street.  It was built in 1861 by John Sumner, merchant, who earlier at Ashton had been also a magistrate and Lieutenant Colonel of the 3rd Battalion.  Carleton Militia.  Beyond this short section of High Street was farm land, including the farms of John McRostie, Peter Cram, the Manny Nowlan estate and David Moffatt.  The stone farm houses of John McRostie and David Moffatt are now the J. H. Dack and Chamney Cook residences.

The buildings on the north side of High Street were rented houses owned by John McEwen, William Neelin, William Moore and Henry Wilson; and the homes of Mrs. John Bell, Arthur Moore and James McDiarmid; together with Joseph Pittard’s wagon shop, and two doors west of it near the future Thomas Street corner, the new foundry enterprise of David Findlay.

Bell Street Businesses

Bell Street an even century ago had some twenty five buildings scattered along its present four blocks.  William Street already had a similar number.  The section from Bell Street north to the Town Line Road, as the first subdivision of the future town, had most of its streets laid out as at present, but north of William Street they held in all only five or six houses.

The block of Bell Street next to Bridge Street was the second early business section of the town.  The first business there had been started about thirty-five years before this time by Robert Bell, together with his elder brother John and assisted for some years by his younger brother James, sons of the Rev. William Bell of Perth.

The new Sumner Arcade on its Bridge Street corner was built on the site of the original 1829 store of Robert Bell, in which the post office once had been located for many years.  The Sumner store was adjoined by several frame shops, William Moore’s tavern, later run by Absolem McCaffery, John McEwen’s hand weaving establishment, Mrs. James Morphy’s home, and near James Street, the late “King James” Morphy’s shoemaking shop.

On the south side of this Bell Street block were several shops with living quarters, including buildings owned by Mrs. Morphy and William Muirhead.  Down by the river side was an old tannery, once owned and possibly built by Robert Bell.  It had been owned for some years by William Morphy junior and was bought in 1861 by Brice McNeely, who built the present stone building there where he continued a leather tanning business for forty years or more.  At the other end of the block rose the venerable Hurd’s Hall, a relatively large two storey frame building then newly built, with its upper floor serving as the first public concert and meeting hall of the village other than the churches.  It was built by the young Dr. William Hurd, son-in-law of James Rosamond.  He had his medical offices there and lived in the former James Rosamond stone residence still standing on the corner across the street.

Going east on Bell Street, the second block from Bridge Street was occupied by the homes of Dr. Hurd and William Muirhead and, on the river near the present electric power plant site, by the sawmill owned by William Muirhead and leased then by Robert Gray.  The third block, between Edmond and Baines Streets, had the large frame Church of England on its north side, and on the south side Robert Gray’s house and a building near the river owned by William Muirhead and apparently occupied in connection with the sawmill.  On Bell Street’s last block, the north side had the home of Absolem McCaffrey, grocer and liquor dealer, the Wilson stone house then occupied by its builder, Dr. William Wilson, and a rented house owned by Robert Bell.  On the river side of Bell Street here there were two rented houses and the home and wagon shop of George McPherson, bailiff and carriage maker.

William Street and The Railroad

North of Bell Street, William Street extended east for five blocks from Bridge Street.  It was a route to the railway station, and was occupied by about thirty buildings, almost all on the north side of the street.  Its tradesmen’s shops included two cabinet shops, a blacksmith shop, a wagon shop and two shoemaker’s shops.  Residents owning their homes on William Street included William Peden and Patrick Struthers, general merchants; Joseph Bond and Horatio Nelson Docherty, shoe makers; Richard Gilhuly, blacksmith; Walter Scott, tailor; Mrs. David Pattie and Henry Wilson.

The stone Presbyterian church, later to be occupied by the St. Andrews congregation, and the old Cameronian Presbyterian church stood at either end of the last block which extends to the railway line.  The railway station for the line opened four years earlier from Brockville to Almonte and at this time in course of construction to Arnprior, stood beyond the eastern side of the village at about the site of the present Legion Hall.  A long shed beside it held cordwood used for locomotive engine fuel, and the station master’s residence was nearby toward the Town Line Road.

George Strett, then called Boswell, was open in 1863 from Bridge Street east to the railway station and Morphy Street ran from Bridge to Baines St.  This section to the Town Line Road was not built on, except for three lone houses on George Street.  Homes on the Ramsay Township side of the Town Line Road and east of Bridge Street were those of Mrs. John Tweedie, Frank Lavallee, cooper, and James Dunlop, cabinet maker and millwright.

Residents Of A Century Ago

Among other residents sharing the Carleton Place village scene of a century ago were the families of Jacob Leslie, cabinet maker; George and Robert McLean and Henry Beck, carpenters;  Alexander Dalgety, carpenter, Hugh McLeod, miller; James Duncan and Duncan McGregor, blacksmiths; Joseph Gilhuly, carriage maker; James McFadden, and William Moore, shoemakers; also William Kelly, saloon keeper; William Paisley, carter; John Cameron, John Neil and Robert Knox, labourers; William Bradley, weaver, and William Nowlan, painter; Joseph Thompson, railway switchman; Thomas Hughes, station master and Frederick S. Haight, M.A., school master.

Resident clergymen were the Revs. John McKinnon, Presbyterian; E. H. Masey-Baker, Anglican; and Lawrence Halcroft, Baptist.  Younger tradesmen of Carleton Place who the census year of 1861 were unmarried employees and apprentices included William Taylor, tinsmith; Alex Ferguson, George Griffith and Thomas Garland, blacksmiths; James Munro and William Laidlaw, carpenters; Henry Cram and Thomas Code, carriage makers; also James Moore and William Ferguson, shoemakers; Richard Willis, labourer; Charles Sumner, chemist; and William Metcalf, painter.  David Moffatt, Moses Neilson and James Scott were apprentice printers and John Brown, Finlay McEwen and James Patterson were clerks.

There were about a dozen residences of stone construction within the central area of the Carleton Place of 1863.  They included the homes of Hugh Boulton, Jr. grist mill owner (later Horace Brown); Dr. William Hurd (formerly James  Rosamond’s and later William Muirhead’s), Napoleon Lavallee and Robert Metcalf, hotel keepers; Archibald McArthur, merchant; Allan McDonald, carding mill owner; Duncan McGregor, blacksmith; James Poole, publisher; John Sumner, merchant; Henry Wilson and Dr. William Wilson.

DANIEL CARON LEAVES LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA

15 May, 2013

Tonight we have news from LAC: Daniel Caron Leaves Library and Archives Canada:
Read more at:
http://clagov.wordpress.com/2013/05/15/daniel-caron/

LIBRARY & ARCHIVES CANADA – THE REALITY FOR PUBLIC LIBRARY USERS

May 2013

 

Amid all the controversy surrounding the budget reductions and staff cuts at Library and Archives Canada, is the reality for public library users.

If you are trying to research your Canadian heritage by using your public library to access the holdings of LAC, sadly, you are out of luck. 

In December 2012, LAC completely stopped interlibrary loans. You are no longer able to interlibrary loan anything from the collection at LAC, as funds have been re-directed to digitization of the collection.   Whether you are looking for newspapers on microfilm  in an effort to find great uncle Fred’s obituary, or that one book on your family history that can only be located at LAC, the only way you are going to see it is to actually go to LAC.  It is beyond comprehension that they think traveling to Ottawa is an acceptable option for 90% of Canadians, while their digitized content is practically nonexistent!

If you are lucky, the item that you want to borrow may be found at a University that will let you interlibrary loan it……..for a price.  So, you wouldn’t want to be guessing too often that it might be the book you’re looking for.  That could get expensive in very short order, as the average price per item is around $10.00.

The following excerpt from the May 3rd edition of the Ottawa Citizen (Record Breaking) exemplifies the frustration being felt by library staff and patrons over the withdrawal of LAC interlibrary loan service:

“In February, Bibliographical Society of Canada president Jane Friskney sent a four-page letter to Caron in which she poured out her frustration over his decision to cut the inter-library loan program while LAC’s online presence remained such a “dog’s breakfast.”

“Most businesses would not dream of terminating an existing platform for service delivery without first ensuring that a new one — one which offers equal and preferably better service — was immediately available,” she wrote. “And yet that is precisely what has happened.”

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Record+breaking/8335572/story.html#ixzz2SiksmXFp

Jane Friskey’s comment says it all! 

Public libraries are all about access to information and service to the public.  LAC’s present course of action is unreasonable as it denies the majority of  Canadians access to their heritage.  There is only one thing to do.  Interlibrary loans need to be reinstated so that all Canadians have reasonable access to ‘our’ heritage.  Of course, digitization needs to proceed, but at a more moderate rate, ensuring future access to the collection.  It’s time to stop putting the cart before the horse!

Please contact the following people if you would like to voice your opinions on the lack of interlibrary loans at Library and Archives Canada :

Contact : The Honourable James Moore, Minister of Canadian Heritage

http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/minstr/moore/cntct/index-eng.cfm

Contact  :  Daniel J. Caron, Deputy Head and Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Deputy Head and Librarian and Archivist of Canada
Library and Archives Canada
Office of the Deputy Head and Librarian and Archivist of Canada

550 de la Cité Blvd
Gatineau, Quebec  K1A 0N4
Canada

Telephone :  819-934-5800

Fax :  819-934-5888

E-mail : danielj.caron@bac-lac.gc.ca

Contact:  Scott Reid, MP, Lanark, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington

Email: // reids@parl.gc.ca//
Carleton Place Office
224 Bridge Street
Carleton Place, ON
K7C 3G9Tel: (613) 257-8130
Fax: (613) 257-4371
Toll-Free: 1-866-277-1577