The Soldiers Return : No. 2 Company of the 42nd Regiment, 1914

 

Carleton Place Herald

Tuesday, June 30, 1914

 

No 2 Company of the 42nd Regiment arrived home from Petawawa on Friday afternoon last, with Lieut. W. H. Hooper in command.

 

The boys, while sunburned and travel-strained, moved with a regularity and precision which spoke well for the work of Col. Serg’t McDougall. The 42nd were personally congratulated in camp by H.R.H the Duke of Connaught on their excellent showing on the three days trip to Chalk River. Corporal Brown and Pte. Leakie qualified as two of the best shots in the regiment, while Serg’t Watson upheld the company’s good name in the sporting events.

 

On arrival at their hall the company dispersed for the year, after cheers for their company, commander and also for Serg’t Major Henry.

Published in: on April 14, 2014 at 2:10 pm  Leave a Comment  
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SHARING MEMORIES, WEEK THIRTY-THREE : Canada’s Centennial (3)

 

 War Clouds Menaced Confederation—Canada

By Howard M. Brown

Carleton Place Canadian, 14 April, 1966

 

In the last year of the founding of the Dominion of Canada, storm clouds surrounded the disturbed Canadian springtime of 1866.  To our forefathers of the towns and farms of the present provinces of Ontario and Quebec, rallying to the defence of their southern border, these storm signals gave new practical weight to the merits of forming a federal union with the provinces of their Atlantic neighbours.

Preserved among the remaining vivid Eastern Ontario pictures of Canada’s spirit of 1866 are the news and editorial columns of the Carleton Place weekly newspaper of that day.  They reflect the indignation and confidence of a province bracing itself to meet the threat of guerrilla attacks which might be made with the tolerance or tacit consent of United States authorities.  The generally similar view shown in newspapers and public attitudes in the future first Dominion of Canada in that troubled time is illustrated by such statements as these, made in this district’s widely circulated Carleton Place Herald:

“It appears almost incredible that the Fenian operations should have been allowed to be carried on in the States to so great a length as they have been.  But at latest reports the Washington authorities seem very little inclined to check their operations, and seem rather amused at the trouble, danger and expense to which the British provinces are subjected.  Mr. Seward (United States Secretary of State), may have to laugh on the other side of his mouth before the American government is done with Fenianism, its consequences and its responsibilities.”

“Prejudiced, although unfairly so, as the Americans are against us, we have but little to hope for or expect from their goodwill to us.  Indeed, without their countenance and support the present state of things could not have existed.  But in their own circumstances we have a reasonable guarantee that they will, if they have not already gone too far, stop the movement.  They know well too that the very first effect of a war with John Bull would be the total and irreparable loss of the fruits of their four years’ struggle with the South, with national bankruptcy and a long train of other evils.  We must not shut our eyes to the fact that if unhappily a war should take place with the United States, Britain and her colonies would suffer severely in the struggle.”

“At Ottawa during the past week guards have been placed at night on the armoury, the banks and the Railway Depot.  The city has a martial appearance.  Bugles are sounding, and the tramp of armed men is becoming familiar to our ears.  The number of volunteers in the city must now be over five hundred men.  There may be no actual necessity for this but it is better to be sure than sorry.

Large reinforcements from England are expected here shortly.  At present we have about ten thousand regulars in Canada, besides eleven thousand volunteers on duty.  Then there are at least fifteen thousand fully armed and ready at a moment’s notice, another eight thousand militia could soon be made available.  The Government has had an immense number of offers of veterans and others who are well drilled.”

A visitor’s impressions of the Carleton Place Rifle Company during its March, 1866 first call to arms were given in the Brockville Recorder, whose writer said:

“We learn from a gentleman who was travelling on the Brockville & Ottawa Railway that on Friday last a company of volunteers, fine looking men under Captain Poole, made their appearance at the Carleton Place railway station in full uniform, guns and bayonets in first best style.  Indeed a gentleman present said he never saw a better looking company of men, or arms better kept.  The company was led by the good old Scotch bag pipes and drum, well played.  The Captain and officers may be proud of their men.  If the interests of the country require it, this company will give a good account of themselves.  When the train started three cheers were given for the Queen, and three more for the Carleton Place volunteers.”

A brigade and divisional muster and review was held at this time (March 23 and 24) at Montreal.  Its proceedings, as reported by Captain Poole in the Carleton Place Herald, included imposition of a severe sentence of a court martial, later greatly reduced, for an unfortunate corporal of the Carleton Place Rifle Company:

“On Friday last, the Militia Brigade mustered at the City Hall in Montreal.  The sentence of the Court Martial on two of the volunteers belonging to the Shefford Light Infantry Company was read by the Assistant Adjutant General, George Smith.  The charge against the men was simply one of gross insubordination, and they were sentenced to sixty days imprisonment without hard labor.”

“On Saturday there was a ‘Grand Divisional Field Day’ of the whole garrison, regulars and volunteers.  The First Brigade, on the left, consisted of H. R. Prince Consort’s Own Rifle Brigade, the 25th.  King’s Own Borderers and the 30th Regiment.  The Second Brigade was composed of the Volunteer Militia, under command of Colonel Dyde, Brigadier.  The inspecting officer was Lieut. General Sir John Michel (then commanding Her Majesty’s forces in North America).”

“In Colonel Dyde’s staff we noticed Lieut. Colonel George Smith, A.A.G.  After the inspection the route of march was then taken up.  Each regiment was preceded by its band.  On completing a lengthy march by way of the following streets…., the regulars proceeded to the barracks and the volunteers turned into Craig Street at the French Square.”

“The volunteers then marched up to the Victoria Square, where the Brigade was drawn up in square of close column and the proceedings and sentence of a Court Martial on Corporal Patrick Tucker of the Carleton Place (C.W.) Rifles were read by Assistant Adjutant General George Smith.  The offence proved in this case was gross insubordination.  The sentence of the Court was ninety days imprisonment, the first and last seven days with hard labour.  At the conclusion of this unpleasant part of the day’s proceedings, the several corps marched off to their armories and dispersed.”

The thanks of Carleton Place to its volunteers at the end of their March service was offered at an oyster supper for the Rifle Company, held within the stone walls of William Kelly’s British Hotel at the corner of Bridge and High Streets, in an evening of songs and speeches.  One erring member of the Company, found after this event to have ‘persisted in wearing his uniform clothes for days together and even sleeping in them’, was fined five dollars with an alternative of ten days in jail.

Expectations of further dangers, which soon were to come, called for continued preparation and frontier watchfulness in the interval between March and June.  In their local prediction in the Carleton Place Herald three months before the June abortive invasion our chronicle Captain Poole wrote, in part:

“By recent orders from Headquarters the several companies relieved from active duty are required to assemble for drill twice a week, for which the non-commissioned officers and men are to receive each the sum of fifty cents for each drill:  the commissioned officers, nothing.  Until further orders the Carleton Place Rifle Company will assemble on Wednesdays and Saturdays at four o’clock.”

“The country is threatened with invasion by a reckless horde of robbers and scoundrels.  The danger may possibly be postponed but there is little doubt  that before many weeks it will come to the hard pinch, and we trust every volunteer will show himself to be A Man And A Soldier, and ‘rally round the flag’ in defence of his country and his home.”

The strains created by an aggressive United States and the threats from irregular forces within its borders were giving their unintended impetus to the union of the Province of Canada with New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, then in its final stages of negotiation.  This was the Herald forecast:

“The idea of Confederation is making rapid strides in the Lower Provinces.  The prospect of ultimate success now amounts to almost a certainty.  The ‘blue noses’ are beginning to regard Canadians as friends and neighbours and are almost inclined to cultivate a closer relationship.  Canadian capital and enterprise would, it is believed, give a powerful stimulus to the progress of New Brunswick and the other colonies.  Again, the abrogation of the Reciprocity Treaty showed, too clearly to be misunderstood, the necessity of commercial union between the Provinces.  The feeling was made stronger by the avowed annexationist doctrines of some American politicians, and their supposed sympathy with the Fenian movement.  The demonstrations of the latter Order on the frontier, with their statements that they were determined to frustrate the Confederation scheme, sever the Colonies from Britain and erect them into a Republic, also have had their effect.”

Carleton Place Connection To The Battle of Ridgeway

Some Further Investigation of Carleton Place’s Connection to the Battle of Ridgeway

 

Howard Brown’s article in the Carleton Place Canadian, 17 March, 1966, titled “Border Raids Promoted Confederation in Canada,” makes reference to a man with a connection to Carleton Place being among those of the ranks of the Queen’s Own Rifles killed in the Fenian Raid at Ridgeway, June 2, 1866.  His name was John H. Mewburn.  “He was a university student, age 21, only son of Harrison C. Mewburn who at this time was headmaster of the Carleton Place grammar school.”  I thought it would be interesting to discover a little bit more about John H. Mewburn, and his role in the ‘forgotten’ Battle of Ridgeway.

A search on Ancestry.com for J. H. Mewburn, born circa 1845 shows him in the 1851 census living in Stamford, Welland Co. with his parents, Harrison C. Mewburn (farmer )and Ann Mewburn, and with his grandparents John Mewburn (Surgeon) and grandmother Henrietta Mewburn.  He was born in England.

A search of the 1861 census only locates his mother, Ann, living with her in-laws, and she is listed as single.  There’s no sign of John or his father in this census.

At some point, his father, Harrison C. Mewburn moved to Carleton Place.  His son was at the University of Toronto in 1866, writing his final exams on the morning of June 2nd, when he was called to battle.

It was not difficult to find more information online, and in books, about J. H. Mewburn and this historically significant battle. Most scholars feel the Battle of Ridgeway led directly to Confederation in 1867.  Most Canadians know very little about the importance of this politically charged battle.

Feeling curious about all of this?  Google searches of ‘Fenian Raids’ elicits the following worthwhile sites to visit:

A picture of soldiers at the Battle of Ridgeway on Our Ontario site:

 http://images.ourontario.ca/whitby/44414/data

A list of casualties at Ridgeway as well as everything else about Ridgeway, can be found on Peter Vronsky’s site.  The list of casualties includes J. H. Mewburn’s name:  http://www.ridgewaybattle.ca/

At the library we have a copy of Peter Vronsky’s book, “Ridgeway: the American Fenian invasion and the 1866 battle that made Canada.”  This is a must-read for anyone looking for a comprehensive account of this battle, and why he believes it has received so little attention. According to Peter Vronsky:

“On June 1, 1866 Canada was invaded by Irish-American Fenian insurgents from their bases in the United States. The Fenian Brotherhood planned to take Canada hostage in an attempt to free Ireland from the British Crown and establish an independent republic. The invasion culminated on June 2, with the Battle of Ridgeway near Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada’s first modern battle and the first fought exclusively by Canadian soldiers and led entirely by Canadian officers.

Nine militia volunteers from Toronto’s Queen’s Own Rifles Regiment were killed in the battle, including three student soldiers from a University of Toronto rifle company called out while writing their final exams and who took the brunt of a Fenian charge at Limestone Ridge.  While Canadians had not fought a major war in Canada since the War of 1812, the Fenians were all battle-hardened veterans of the American Civil War, many having served in crack Irish brigades.

The “Ridgeway Nine” were Canada’s first soldiers killed in action and Ridgeway was the last battle fought in Ontario against a foreign invader, but after the disastrous conclusion the Macdonald government covered-up what happened so thoroughly that most Canadians today have never heard of this battle.”

 

Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada site:  – Has a picture and a biography of John H. Mewburn. Here we discover that his middle name is Harriman, and we learn the graphic details of how he died:

http://qormuseum.org/2012/04/19/rifleman-john-harriman-mewburn/

The band, Fenian Raid, has a site with battle songs (‘Tramp, tramp, tramp’), more history and pictures of the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada, & talks about ‘The Maple Leaf Forever’ :  http://fenianraid.ca/fr_fenianraids.cfm

Howard Brown’s article in the Carleton Place Canadian of 04 August, 1960, describes the uniforms, and gives us an abbreviated list of the men of the local Rifle Company who defended their country at Brockville, Ontario in 1866.  J. H. Mewburn’s name is not among them, so it seems that his only connection to Carleton Place was that his father lived here:

“In a target shooting competition at Carleton Place between the local Rifle Company and the Almonte Infantry Company, the rifle company appeared in its new uniforms with green tunics, grey pants with red facings, and dark belts.  The infantry uniforms had scarlet tunics, grey pants and white belts.  The impressive headpiece of both companies’ uniforms was an ornamented cap known as a shako.”

Brockville river front and railway communications were protected by the provisional battalion which already had been called up in March, formed of the Brockville, Perth, Carleton Place, Almonte and Gananoque companies. 

Raids from the United States upon border points were made in 1866 by groups known as Fenians, whose professed objective was political independence for Ireland.  The Carleton Place and Almonte volunteer companies were dispatched to Brockville in June.  Captain of the Almonte company was James D. Gemmill.  Total of all ranks serving from Carleton Place numbered fifty-seven.  Under local officers Captain James C. Poole, Lieut. John Brown and Ensign J. Jones Bell, they included such Carleton Place and township family names as Burke, Coleman, Cram, Dack, Docherty, Duff, Enright, Ferguson, Fleming, Hamilton, Kilpatrick, Leslie, Lavallee, Moffatt, Moore, Morphy, and McArthur, McCaffrey, McCallum, McEwen, McFadden, McNab, McNeely and McPherson, Neelin, Patterson, Pattie, Rattray, Sinclair, Stewart, Sumner, Williams, Willis and Wilson.

Volunteers from these and other Lanark County areas served also in the Fenian Raids of 1870.  Drill halls built in 1866 at county centres including Perth, Carleton Place and Almonte were used for many years.  The Carleton Place drill shed was at the market square between Beckwith and Judson Streets, at the present site of the skating rink.  Almonte’s military quarters were combined with the North Lanark Agricultural Society’s main exhibition building then being erected.”

It is doubtful that any of the Carleton Place men saw active duty during the Fenian Raid of 1866, as after June 2nd the Fenians’ supplies of men and munitions had been curtailed. 

If, as all of the above evidence suggests, the Battle of Ridgeway precipitated Confederation a year later, why has it been forgotten, or has it been deliberately covered up?

Maybe it’s time to breathe some new life into the Battle of Ridgeway, and give it the recognition it deserves in 2017, when Canada celebrates its 150th birthday.

Stay tuned for more Confederation Series articles by Howard M. Brown!

SHARING MEMORIES, WEEK EIGHTEEN

8 H.P. Ford Was Bought By Findlays – First Local Car

The Carleton Place Canadian, 15 September, 1960

By Howard Morton Brown

 

Some of the local events of fifty to sixty years ago in the Carleton Place area are recalled in the present section of a continued story summarizing the history of this town’s early days.

This was the time which saw both the heyday of the Empire on which the sun never set and the end of the Victorian era.  It opened to the martial air of The British Grenadiers, with Canadian soldiers on active service in South Africa, and closed on a modern theme with such developments as the motor car and electricity on their way towards changing the ways of life of half the world.

In the first year of the present century Canadian soldiers, including several volunteers from Carleton Place, were in South Africa serving in the Boer War.  Some of the present century’s great changes in living conditions had their start in these years.  Electricity began to be used as a growing source of power instead of mainly for lighting and communication equipment.  While annual local horse shows were being held the first automobiles appeared on the town’s streets.  Business and social life began to have a greater resemblance to conditions of the present.

Among the towns of the Ottawa Valley, Carleton Place, with its population reduced to 4,000 at the opening of the century, had been outdistanced in size by the growth of Smiths Falls and Pembroke, each of which had attained a population of about 5,000.  The brief views of local scenes and events which follow are based on news reports of the two Carleton Place weekly newspapers in the years from 1900 to 1909.

South African War

1900 – To supply serge for British army uniforms the Canada Woollen Mills expanded its operations here at the Gillies and Hawthorne mills. 

Local talent presented the Temple of Fame, an historical pageant.  The town had a day of enthusiastic celebrations when news of the Relief of Ladysmith came from South Africa.

Abner Nichols & Son brought their season’s log drive down the lake to their newly opened sawmill at the riverside on Flora Street; while two drives of logs, ties and telegraph poles were reaching the mill operated by Williams, Edwards & Company at the dam.  A new branch of the Union Bank of Canada was in operation in Carleton Place, in addition to the longer established branch of the Bank of Ottawa.

The Carleton Place Canoe Club was reorganized as a racing association and joined the new international canoe association.  A district grouping to include Ottawa, Brockville, Aylmer, Britannia and Carleton Place clubs was planned.  This town’s club ordered its first war canoe.

Peter Salter bought and reopened the Carleton House, the oldest two storey stone building in the town.  He renamed it the Leland Hotel.

Findlay’s Foundry Rebuilt

1901 – Findlay Brothers large new stove foundry of brick construction was built on land sold by the Canada Lumber Company.

The McDonald & Brown woolen mill at Mill and Judson Streets was continued in operation by John Brown on the retirement of John McDonald.

In the first local celebration of Labour Day the moulders and machinists unions held a sports day in Gillies Grove near the lower woollen mill, with football, baseball and lacrosse games and track and field events.

William H. Hooper, who had returned to Ottawa from the South African War, bought Charles C. Pelton’s Carleton Place photographic business.

A Carleton Place firemen’s demonstration was attended by the fire companies from Renfrew, Arnprior, Lanark, Perth and Smiths Falls, the Ottawa Nationals baseball team and the Perth Crescents lacrosse team.  Among its other sports events in Gillies Grove were hose reel races, tug of war contests, a hub and hub race and tossing the caber.  A parade included the fire brigades, decorated floats, and the Town Council and citizens in carriages.  A massed band uniting the citizens’ brass and silver bands of Pembroke, Smiths Falls and Carleton Place marched through the town in an evening parade, playing The British Grenadiers.  Officers of  the Carleton Place band included leader Joseph McFadden and secretary James Edwards.

About sixty neighbours helped in the raising of a barn of forty feet height at the farm of John McArton in the sixth concession of Ramsay near Carleton Place.

With Robert C. Patterson, barrister, as mayor, the town bought a twelve ton $3,000 steam road roller.

Queen Victoria’s long and illustrious reign ended early in 1901 and Edward VII became King.  At Ottawa the Duke and Duchess of York – the future King George V and Queen Mary – witnessed a war canoe race of Ontario and Quebec canoe clubs including Carleton Place.  South African War service medals were presented and a statue of the late Queen was unveiled on Parliament Hill.

Shanty Horses

1902 – The closed Carleton Place sawmills and upper Mississippi reserve dams of the Canada Lumber Company were bought by H. Brown & Sons for water conservation and power development uses.

The Canadian Canoe Association held its annual regatta at Lake Park during two days of high winds, with over two hundred visiting paddlers present from clubs of Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa, Smiths Falls and Brockville.  The mile course, from Nagle’s Shore to about the Lake Park steamer dock, was measured in the previous winter on the ice.

A railway bridge of steel construction on stone piers replaced the former railway bridge across the Mississippi at Carleton Place.

At the Queens and Leland hotel yards, agents were hiring teams of horses in December for winter work at Ottawa Valley lumber shanties.

 

Two Mills Closed

1903 – The Gillies and Hawthorne woollen mills – recently working on overtime hours with 192 employees, after six years of improvements under the ownership of Canada Woollen Mills Limited – were closed.  The reason was stated to be loss of Canadian markets to British exporters of tweeds and worsteds.  The company went into bankruptcy.

Twenty miles of toll roads were bought by Lanark County and freed of tolls.

For the killing of a foundry employee by stabbing during a week-end drunken quarrel, an elderly resident of Carleton Place was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to a three year term of imprisonment in the Kingston penitentiary.

Carleton Place curlers, with William Baird and Dr. D. A. Muirhead as skips, won the Lanark County Curling League cup.

Town Park

1904 – The Caldwell sawmill property between Lake Avenue and the river was bought by the town and, after consideration for industrial uses, was reserved for a town park.

Sir Wilfred Laurier addressed a Carleton Place meeting on behalf of T. B. Caldwell, successful North Lanark candidate for Parliament.

An eight horsepower Ford was bought by Findlay Brothers as the first automobile owned in Carleton Place.  It was the local harbinger of great changes in transportation and in ways of life, comparable to the results of railway construction of fifty years earlier.

Street Lighting

1905 – Carleton Place street lighting was improved under a ten year contract, with introduction of a year-round all night service and erection of 150 street lights to supplement the arc lamp system.

Use of the Town Park was opened by the visit of a three ring circus with a thirty cage menagerie, a twelfth of July celebration attended by 5,000 out of town visitors, and a lacrosse game between Renfrew and Carleton Place teams at the newly built grandstand and fenced athletic grounds. 

Car Casualty

1906 – A fire at Gillies Engine Foundry and Boat Works destroyed the stone building’s two top storeys and a number of completed motor launches.  Work was resumed by some twenty employees. 

A mica-splitting industry of the General Electric Company was being carried on in J. R. McDiarmid’s Newman Hall at the corner of Bridge and William Streets.  Gardiner’s Creamery was built on Mill Street.  Concrete sidewalks were being laid on many town streets. 

Thousands of European immigrants were passing through Carleton Place weekly on their way to western Canada.  An exhibition of moving pictures was held in the Town Hall by the Salvation Army in aid of its work for assistance of immigrants.

For causing the death of his brother in a drunken quarrel in a motor boat near Lake Park, a local resident pleaded guilty of manslaughter and was sentenced to four years imprisonment.

The first car fatality in Carleton Place occurred when Samuel A. Torrance’s automobile collided with a locomotive at the railway station crossing.  One of his passengers was killed. 

The first of a series of annual horse shows was held at the Town Park.

Bates & Innes Mill

1907 – Bates and Innes Co. Limited bought and equipped the former Gillies Woollen Mill as a knitting mill.  A Quebec company, the Waterloo Knitting Co. Ltd., similarly re-opened the Hawthorne Woollen Mill.

The Carleton Place Canoe Club won the Canadian war canoe championship and other races at the year’s Canadian Canoe Association meet, held at Montreal.

Mississippi lumbering continued on a reduced scale.  A Lanark Era spring report said:  – The Nichols drive on the Clyde parted company here with Charlie Hollinger’s logs at the Caldwell booms, and swept its way over the dam to await the coming of the Mississippi sawlogs.  The gang folded their tents and rolled away up to Dalhousie Lake where the rear of the drive floats.  It will take about two weeks to wash the mouth of the Clyde, and then the whole bunch will nose away over the Red Rock and on to Carleton Place.  While going through Lanark some of the expert drivers did a few stunts for Lanark sightseers.  Joe Griffiths ran the rapids on a cedar pole just big enough to make a streak on the water.  The Hollinger logs were retained at the Caldwell mill, where they are now being rapidly manufactured into lumber.

Street Traffic Rides

1908 – A Bridge Street runaway accident took the life of Archibald McDonnell, aged 77, son of one of Beckwith township’s original few settlers of 1816.

Spring floods burst the old lumber company millpond dam and two flumes at Carleton Place.  Users of Mississippi River water power united to plan the building of retaining dams at headwater locations.

George H. Findlay was mayor, W. E. Rand, M.A. was High School principal and principal of the public schools was Reg. Blaisdell.

Roller Skating

1909 – Bates & Innes knitting mill, after making waterpower improvements, began running night and day with about 150 employees.  The Hawthorne knitting mill was closed by reason of financial difficulties, and its operating company was reorganized as the Carleton Knitting Co. Ltd.

Construction of a hydro electric power plant was begun by H. Brown & Sons at the former site of the Canada Lumber Company mills, after several years of preparation of the riverbed including tailrace excavation and building of a concrete millpond dam.

A roller skating rink with a new skating floor was re-opened at the militia drill hall on the market square.

J. W. Bengough, noted Canadian cartoonist, entertained a Town Hall audience with his skill, making such sketches of local celebrities as Reeve William Pattie at his desk, Dr. J. J. McGregor extracting a horses’ tooth, Arthur Burgess in his automobile, William Miller in a horse deal, and Tom Bolger with his hotel bus at the railway depot.

 

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SHARING MEMORIES, WEEK ELEVEN

November 13th, 2012 marked the dedication ceremony for the A. Roy Brown memorial mural, at 220 Bridge Street in Carleton Place.  Funded by the Town of Carleton Place, this mural is an excellent depiction of the famous WWI battle between Captain A. Roy Brown and the famed Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen.  The original art was provided by the renowned military artist, Mr. Stephen P. Quick, from a book by Lieutenant-Colonel David L. Bashow called ‘Knights of the air”.  The mural was painted by Ottawa artist Shaun McInnis, and completed in September 2012.

Arthur Roy Brown is the WWI flying ace officially credited with shooting down German pilot Manfred von Richtohofen over France, on April 21, 1918.  The Australians have always claimed that it was their ground gunners who were responsible for downing the Red Baron, but the evidence credits Brown with the deed.  There is a new book at the library, a two volume set, written by Alan D. Bennett, called “Captain Roy Brown: a true story of the Great War, 1914-1918,” that sheds more light on the life of A. Roy Brown, and in particular, on this famous battle.

Below are some pictures of the event, and of the mural as well, which I captured on 13 November, 2012.

A. Roy Brown mural, dedication ceremony, 13 November, 2012.

Mural artist, Shaun McInnis

John Nichols, husband of Carol Brown who is the neice of A. Roy Brown

Rob Probert, President of the Roy Brown Society, and master of ceremony

Scott Reid, MP

Follow this link to read the Ottawa Citizen report on the mural : http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Dave+Brown+Great+hero+found+downing+infamous+Baron/7567574/story.html

SHARING MEMORIES, WEEK NINE

With Remembrance Day just around the corner, I began to compile some information about the names appearing on the Carleton Place War Memorial, which can easily be seen from the Library windows fronting on Memorial Park.  It occured to me that there was more to know about these veterans than just their names – important stories to be shared about people in this community who had made the ultimate sacrifice.

Upon comparing the names on the cenotaph with the names in Larry Gray’s two books, “We are the Dead,” about the WWI veterans, and “Fathers, Brothers, and Sons,” about the WWII veterans, all of whom sacrificed their lives in those wars, I made the appalling discovery that some names are missing from the memorial.

While nothing can make up for this oversight, except having their names inscribed thereon, I feel very fortunate that Larry Gray wrote both of his books about the Carleton Place men and women who died during those wars.  How else would anyone know about our ‘unknown soldiers,’ or the battles they fought in?

In light of this discovery, I will now tell you about the men, the ‘unknown soldiers’, whose names you do not see on the town cenotaph, but whose names and stories we now know – thanks to Larry Gray.  Hopefully the names will be added to the memorial in the future, and hopefully Larry Gray will not mind me using the information from his books to honour these particular people here.

Colin Duncan P. Sinclair

Colin was born June 2, 1897 at Oliver’s Ferry (Rideau Ferry, Ontario).  He was the eldest son of Rev. R. C. H. Sinclair.  When he enlisted with the 3rd University Company in Montreal in June 1915, he was an 18 year old student, having just graduated from the high school in Carleton Place.  He was 5’5” tall and weighed 122 pounds.

After a short training session in Canada, he sailed to England, arriving September 14, 1915. On November 30th he was transferred to the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, and joined them in the trenches in France on February 12, 1916.  Colin observed his 19th birthday in the trenches during the Battle of Mount Sorrel, which occurred in the Ypres Salient in Sanctuary Wood, June 2-13.  Four Hundred Patricia’s lost their lives in this battle.

By September 15, 1916, the PPCLI’s were in the Somme at Fabeck Graben.  During the battle for Flers Courcelette, Colin would have seen the British-invented tank used in warfare for the first time.

Colin distinguished himself in the assault on Vimy Ridge, and considered himself lucky to have survived this harrowing battle.  After fighting with the Patricia’s for a year and four months in France, he applied for his commission as an infantry officer.  On April 17, 1917, he was transferred to England to the Eastern Ontario Regiment depot in Seaford, where he completed his officer training and was made a temporary lieutant.

However, Colin had his sights set on flying and on October 30 was sent to the Royal Flying Corps School of Aeronautics at Reading for flight training as a pilot.  It was at the advanced training school at Stamford that his career in the air ended.  On March 17, 1918, at age 20, Colin Sinclair was accidentally killed at Bickers Fen, Donnington, Lincolnshire, as a result of an aeroplane crash.  He is buried in Stamford Cemetery, Lincolnshire, United Kingdom.

Facts from “We Are The Dead”, by Larry Gray.  Post by Shirley Jones-Wellman

Ralph Patterson Simpson

While there is an R. Simpson engraved on the Carleton Place cenotaph, there were really two Simpson brothers using that initial.  I assume the R. Simpson on the memorial refers to Charles Ross Simpson, who was always referred to as Ross, and who died from his wounds on January 13th, 1921, at the Euclid Hall Hospital in Toronto.

I believe that it is his brother, Ralph Patterson Simpson, whose name does not appear on the cenotaph, as he didn’t die from his wounds until 1932, by which time all of the names had more than likely been engraved thereon.

The following is Ralph’s story:

Ralph was born in Carleton Place on April 10, 1895, the eldest son of William and Minnie Simpson.  When he joined the 42nd Regiment on March 6, 1915, he was twenty-one years old, 5’11” tall, with a fair complexion, blue eyes and fair hair.

Relatively soon, he was transferred to the 38th Canadian Infantry Battalion in Ottawa.  He arrived overseas at Shorncliffe, England on July 4, 1915.  On August 25 he was drafted to France and the 2nd Battalion, which was already in the field.

On September 12, 1915, as the 2nd Battalion was marching into position for the attack on Courcelette, Ralph was wounded by a rifle bullet hitting his right thigh.  After convalescing in England he rejoined his Battalion in the field on November 17, 1917.

Ralph survived the rest of the war unscathed, and left for Canada on February 8, 1919, and was discharged from the army on March 3, 1919.  He lived out the rest of his short life in Carleton Place, dying at the age of thirty-six years, eleven months on March 5, 1932.  His death was deemed by military authorities to have been attributable to his war wound.

From “We Are The Dead” by Larry Gray.  Post by Shirley Jones-Wellman

Robert Franklyn Preston Abbott

Franklyn was born the only son and child of Mr. & Mrs. Charles H. Abbott in Carleton Place on May 14, 1897.

In June 1916, he went to Toronto to the Curtiss Flying School, obtaining his pilot’s certificate on November 7, 1916.  The very same day he was enrolled in the Royal Navy Air Service as a probationary flight officer. 

By January 14, 1917, he was overseas and training at Chingford, England.  On June 21 he went to France and joined No. 3 Squadron at Dunkirk, where he most likely flew Scouts, and then Sopwith Camels, in support of the ground war.

On August 16, 1917, Franklyn was flying on patrol when he initiated a strafing attack on the German airdrome at Uytkerke.   According to The Almonte Gazette of October 5, 1917, “Flight Lieutenant Franklyn Abbott, who was wounded in the upper thigh….received his wound in the air, after dispatching some …. (enemy) planes).”  Franklyn spent time in hospitals in England before being sent home to Canada for rehabilitation.

As of April 15, 1918, Franklyn had returned to the war with No. 4 Squadron in Dunkirk, providing ground support and antisubmarine defence patrols.  By September, Franklyn was admitted to hospital in England suffering from tuberculosis.  He relinquished his commission due to ill health, going back to Canada to recuperate in April of 1919.

Franklyn Abbott died in the Kingston, Ontario, isolation hospital on March 25, 1932, from tuberculous meningitis, the effect of war service.

From “We Are The Dead”, by Larry Gray.  Post by Shirley Jones Wellman

William Andrew Fanning

William Andrew Fanning was born in Carleton Place on November 23, 1889, and was the son of Edward and Eliza Ann Fanning. 

When he enlisted with the Active Force on December 15, 1915, he already had six months service with the Composite Battalion of the 1st Regiment, Grenadier Guards of Canada, which became officially known as the 87th Canadian Infantry Battalion.  At that time he was twenty-six years old and stood 5’10” tall.

On April 23rd he sailed upon the Empress of Britain from Halifax to Liverpool, England, where he was transferred to the 11th Brigade, landing at Le Havre in France on August 12, 1916.

On June 26, 1917, William Fanning was confirmed in the permanent rank of lance corporal, and that same day was wounded by artillery shrapnel.  On June 29 he arrived at No. 35 General Hospital in Calaise where he was admitted “with a gunshot would (shrapnel) to the right thigh causing a compound fracture of the lower third of the femur (just above the knee).”

Arriving by ship at the Queen’s Military Hospital in Kingston on March 26, he was treated and declared “medically unfit for further service arising from wounds.”

He died on May 12, 1931, at the age of forty-one years.  His death was deemed, by the government, as “attributable to military service.”

 

Thomas James Gorrod

 Thomas Gorrod was overage when he enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force on October 19, 1915, at Kingston, Ontario.  He was born, educated, and married  in London, England, emigrating to Canada around 1902.  It is thought that his real birth date was sometime around 1865, making him actually fifty years old in 1915.  He was sent to the 80th Battalion, and was described as 5’4” tall, with a fair complexion, grey eyes and brown hair.

 Thomas was part of the 80th Battalion, which embarked aboard the S.S. Baltic for England and arrived in Liverpool on May 29, 1916. 

 On May 23, 1917, Thomas was transferred to the Canadian Railway Troops at Purfleet in Essex, and finally, on June 19, 1917, he landed in France with the 10th Battalion, Canadian Railway Troops.  They labored under the dreadful conditions of the Ypres Salient before Passchendaele, and carried out their work with remarkable speed.

 On August 17, 1917, Thomas Gorrod was promoted to the rank of corporal, but began to have trouble with his eyes.  During hospitalization for a corneal ulcer, his true age was discovered, and he was discharged from the Canadian Expeditionary Force as overage and medically unfit on November 8, 1918.

 Thomas lived out the rest of his life in Carleton Place, and died on December 16, 1933.  In the edition of December 20, the Herald reported that:  “Thomas Gorrod, for many years an employee of the Findlay Stove foundry died in the hospital in Ottawa on Saturday, following a lengthy illness.”

OLD TIME ADS FROM THE 1850’S

Old Time Ads Indicate High Times Lived In ’50s

Carleton Place Canadian, 13 March, 1958

By Howard Morton Brown

 

Vast differences exist between living conditions today and those of former Ottawa Valley generations.  There are also some perhaps surprising resemblances.  Some of these contrasts are brought to life in the files of this district’s long-established weekly newspapers.  One of the more completely preserved, with volumes extending from the 1850’s , was published in Carleton Place.  Its advertising columns offer one means of viewing almost at first hand some of the past ways of life of this region.

A few of the local advertisements of yesterday are recalled to view here.  They are taken in abbreviated form from the Carleton Place Herald at the period of its first publisher.

Advertising Rates

The Lanark Herald will be published every Friday morning, at Carleton Place by James C. Poole.  Subscription terms 10 shillings per annum in advance, or 12s.6d. if not paid until after six months.  Rates of advertising – 6 lines or under, 2s.6d., and 7 ½ d. for each subsequent insertion; 7 to 10 lines 3s4d., and 10d. for each subsequent insertion; above 10 lines 4d. per line, first insertion, and 1 d. per line for subsequent insertions.  Job printing executed.

Barter Economy

One Thousand Sheepskins Wanted – Also all descriptions of Furs and Skins.  Fresh Teas and Tobacco given in exchange.  James McDiarmid, September 27, 1850.

Indelicate Letters

Notice to Correspondents.  We decline to publish the letter of Anti-Bed-Bug, as it contains expressions which we consider indelicate and therefore unfit for our columns. – December 13, 1850.

Gaelic Kirk

Died.  At the Manse, in Beckwith, on Friday last, in the fiftieth year of his age, the Reverend John Smith, Minister of the Kirk in Beckwith Township.  For seventeen years he has diligently and faithfully discharged the duties of his office.  Mr. Smith had been in the habit of officiating both in English and Gaelic.  The deceased leaves a wife and six children – April 25, 1851.

Horse vs. Cow

Carleton Place Debating Club.  The question for last week, “Whether the Cow or the Horse is of most advantage to mankind,” was decided in favor of the Cow.  The question for next week is whether the application of Steam or the invention of the Printing Press is of most advantage to the world.  A vote of thanks was given to Mr. Johnston Neilson for the able and eloquent address with which he favored us.  – Bennett Rosamond, secretary, May 8, 1851.

New York Styles

Gents, Look Here!  – direct from New York – Spring and Summer Fashions for 1851.  – Patrick Galvin, April 4, 1851.

Oriental Circus

Jane & Co’s.  Oriental Circus will exhibit in Franktown on Saturday August 9 – at Perth on August 8 and at Richmond on August 11, 1851.

The Company on entering Town will be preceded by the Georgeous Band Car drawn by Eight Syrian Camels.  Feats of Horsemanship and Contortionism.  Magnificent Oriental Pageant.  Admission 1s.3d.  Doors open at 2 and 7.

Chest of Tea

Lost, by the subscriber on Saturday November 29, 1851, on his way from Bytown to Lanark, A Chest of Tea, marked with the initials of James and Holmes Mair.  Any person leaving the same at Smith’s Hotel, or information leading to its recovery, will receive a suitable reward. – James Forgie.

Moulders Apprentice

Wanted.  A young man of steady industrious habits, as an apprentice to the Moulding business. – Samuel Fuller, April 5, 1852.

Aged 103

Died, in Ramsay, on Saturday June 5, 1852, Mr. John Griffith, aged 103 years.

Not Burnt Up

Burnt Out!  But Not Burnt Up!

The subscribers have again got their Foundry in operation and are ready to receive orders for Grist and Saw Mill Castings – Stoves – Ploughs – Kettles, Coolers, Waggon & Cart Boxes, Road Scrapers, etc. – Frost & Wood.  Smiths Falls, March 21, 1854.

Fences Moved

Notice.  The Municipal Council of the Township of Beckwith, at their meeting held April 25th last, decided that all Fences on the public highways in the Township and on streets in Franktown and Carleton Place be removed to the full legal breadth; and that Pathmasters shall prosecute for neglect or non-compliance.  – Ewen McEwen, Clerk.  Franktown May 5, 1854.

Advertising Medium

Notice to Advertisers.  The large circulation of 2,500 to which the Herald has now attained, renders it a valuable medium. – September 12, 1854.

Smart Girls

Wanted.  At the Herald Office, two Smart Girls, to learn to set Type, fold and address newspapers; fold, stitch and cover pamphlets, etc.  Good wages will be given – June 28, 1855.

Fall Fashions

Colin Sinclair, Tailor & Clothier, Carleton Place, announces he has received a stock of Fall Goods, consisting of Broad Cloths, Cashmeres, Siberian, Lyons Cloth etc. 

Tweeds – Veilings, Gloves, Neckties, Mufflers, Shirts and Shirting – Drawers, etc. – Ladies Capeing – New York and Paris Fashions for Fall 1856, just received.

Appleton Tannery

New Tannery in Appleton!  The subscriber will pay in cash $6 per 100 pounds for any quantity of Green Hides!  Delivered at the Tannery, or will pay the Highest Market Price going during the Winter.  –  Peter & John Cram.  Appleton, November 11, 1856.

Man-Traps and Spring Guns

The Subscriber Hereby forbids any person Trespassing on his property, being the west half of Lot 23, Concession 6, Ramsay, because from depradations thereon committed he has been under the necessity of placing Man-Traps and Spring Guns.  Any person thereby injured will have himself to blame.  John B_____; Ramsay, December 10, 1857.

Mammoth Camera

W. R. Godkin would announce that he has set up his apparatus for a few days at Lavallee’s Hotel, Carleton Place.  He has a mammoth camera, expressly for taking side-light pictures.  He is now taking Pictures such as Melan Types, Cameotypes, Photographs, Sphereotypes and Ambro types. He has a new quick-working camera for all kinds of weather.  Mrs. Godkin is alsto taking likenesses at the residence of Trueman Raymond, Almonte. – January 7, 1858.

Extensive Auction

Lothrup’s Annual Auction Sale will commence at Carleton Place on January 12, 1858 at the Hotel of Mr. Lavallee, when will be opened for sale, an extensive assortment of goods consisting in part of 120 Chests Tea, 10 Kegs Tobacco, 50 bags Almonds, Walnuts and Filberts, 30 Boxes Raisins, 25 Boxes Pipes, 10 Boxes Starch, 20 Boxes Blue; also 30 cases dry goods suitable for the Season amounting to nearly £10,000 which must be sold.

Trotting Match

A Trotting Match will come off February 3, 1858 at Mr. Nicholas Dickson’s Landing on the Mississippi River near Carleton Place.  One mile heats for any horse owned in Ramsay, Drummond or Beckwith, for one set of Cutter Harness with $20 for the first class horses, and £2 for the second class horses under 5 years.  Entrance Fee 5 shillings; Judges Abraham Code, Innisville; John Wilson, Ramsay; John Roberts, Beckwith.

Good Old Corner

John Sumner having leased the premises owned by Robert Bell Esq. and lately occupied by Messrs. Campbell & Morphy, will reopen the same January 21, 1858 with and entirely new stock of Dry Goods selected by himself during the last season when in Great Britain. – No Liquors will be sold on the premises except High Wines by the Cask, any quantity of which he will sell low for cash only.  Come and pay a visit to the good old Corner and remember your old Friend.

Six Months Credit

We the undersigned merchants hereby give public notice that, in order to shorten the length of credits that are given, their terms will be:  Accounts to become due and payable on the 1st of August and the 1st of February in each and every year, and that interest thereafter will be charged until paid.  May 1st, 1858.

     Almonte:  James H. Wylie, John Menzies, Matthew Anderson, McFarlane & Anderson, H. W. Rea.

     Clayton:  Wm. Leary & Co., Thos. Coulter & Co., Wm. Wesley Austin.

     Carleton Place: John Sumner, Tennant & Struthers, John Dewar.

Boulton’s Mills

The ‘Old Favorite Miller’ has left the Victoria Mills (Almonte) and is now in Carleton Place Mills where he can give the greatest satisfaction to the public. – Hugh Boulton, September 2, 1858.

Furniture and Coffin Makers

Owing to my absence from Carleton Place for a time, Mr. John Hogg has been employed to conduct the Cabinet Business formerly carried on by me in this place.  His experience in Montreal, Toronto and Perth and thorough knowledge of Cabinet making will enable him to produce the newest styles and best of workmanship.  As Undertakers they will as usual be ready to wait on those who may require their services. – Wm. J. Bell & Co. April 7, 1859.

Liquor and Groceries

Look Here!  Liquors and Groceries – Stock consists of Champagne, Wine, Brandy, Rum, Spirits, Scotch Malt, Old Tom, Gin, Proof Whiskey, High Wines, by the barrel or otherwise, Lemon Syrup and Beer, and Quite an assortment of groceries.  Cash or Farmers Produce taken in Payment. – William Kelly, June 13, 1859.

First Railway

First Arrival by Railway Direct to Carleton Place!  Teas, Teas, part of the Cargo of the Ship ‘Gauntlet’, from China, 112 Boxes and 48 Catties – Also a large stock of Harvest Tools – Also by the same conveyance a further supply of fancy and staple Dry Goods and a very full assortment of Shelf Hardware, Crockery, etc. – A. McArthur, June 30, 1859.

Ramsay Lead Miners

Ramsay Mining Company.  Miners Wanted – good wages – Application to be made to Mr. E. H. Parsons at the office of the Commercial Advertiser, Montreal. – E. H. Parsons, Secretary, July 28, 1859.

Brockville Excursion

Cheap Excursion to Brockville on Thursday August 25th.  Fare from Almonte, Carleotn Place, Franktown, and back, only One Dollar!

Leave Almonte 7:30 a.m., Carleton Place 8:00 a.m., smiths Falls 9:15 a.m., arriving at Brockville 11 a.m.  Returning will leave Brockville at 4:45 p.m., reaching Almonte at 8 p.m. – Robert Watson, Managing Director, Brockville & Ottawa Railway, Brockville, August 16, 1859.

Runaway Apprentice

Notice is Hereby Given that Malachia McAuliffe ran away from this office before the end of his term of apprenticeship, and that any person hiring or harboring him will be prosecuted according to law. – Herald Office, January 2, 1860.

Deer Hounds $25

Deer Hounds for Sale.  A few first rate Hounds, well trained to deer hunting.  Price £5 each. – Herald Office, January 6, 1860.

 

 

 

Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Regiment

 

Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Dot Village With Local Names

From the Carleton Place Canadian, 04 January, 1945

Originally from The Smiths Falls Record News

 

An Italian Village – The Canadian Lanark and Renfrew Scottish are resting and training in this village for the day and will bring new Italian battles.  Their colonel, from Medicine Hat, Alta., says his men are scattered over three villages and three hills, but here is the greatest concentration of them all.

The village is one of story and atmosphere.  It stands on a hill and atop the hill is a great and decaying castle, built by the blue-blooded Maletesta family in the 1300’s as a bulwark against transgression on its Adriatic domain.  Below, the village clings to itself, its sturdy stone houses parted by the tight, cobbled streets filled now with the vehicles of modern war and peopled with a contented human amalgam of men from Victoria and Red Deer, Alta., and somewhere in Nova Scotia, of a few hundred refugees from Rimni and the districts around there and a few hundred more of the normal population.

Here you see a farmer guiding his oxen and cart down the hill to his farm.  There you see the village priest hurrying home.  The Roman Catholic soldiers attend his services each Sunday in the village church.  Here you see a plaque commemorating the dead of the last war.  In front of it hangs an ornate lamp, like something out of a Christmas card of old England.  A few feet away is a plaque to the dead of the Ethiopian war.  Its names have been obliterated by a black smudge authored by someone, sometime.

The Scottish have marked the village liberally with the names common in their new parent region, the Ottawa Valley.  Here is Lanark avenue, there O’Brien’s theatre where Italians and Canadians watch the shows together, here Lennox Lunch (the men’s kitchen), Pembroke Hotel (officers’ mess), there Beamish Stores (the quartermasters’ stores).

Over one door hangs a sign “Royal Bank of Canada.”  Inside Capt. G. L. Matthews, Ottawa, the paymaster, and his sergeant, Frank Rigley, of Verdun, Que., hold down “the warmest spot in town.”  Reading the Montreal Standard over the heat of their little oil stove is Pte. W. N. Barrington, Verdun, Que.

Rigley talks of the excellent feelings between the Canadians and Italians:  “This is the best place we’ve struck yet.  Leave out our clothes and they’ll wash them, press them and have them back in a hurry.  We gave the mother (of the family sharing the house with them) a suit of underwear for the old man yesterday and she nearly fell on her knees thanking us.”

Outside again you meet Capt. R. P. Neil, who has found two others from Pembroke, where “A” company of the Lanark and Renfrew hails from.  They are Ptes. Huntley Munro and Michael Gregg.  In Adanac Inn, the little hole in the wall that is the dry canteen, you meet Auxiliary Services Officer Michael Quinn from Perth, Ont., the regiment’s home town.

From this village and from two others – the troops have called them Smiths Falls and Carleton Place – the battalion sends its men on seven-day leaves to Rome and Florence, 48’s to a leave town on the coast, and also sends them out to train and keep tough in the neighbouring countryside.

On the outskirts, near a little hillside graveyard for the British soldiers who died fighting here, is “Tartan Dive” where the men rally at night to have a drink of wine and listen to the Italian orchestra and chew the fat.  It used to be a Fascist recreation room.  Now Sgt. Harry Jantz, of Saskatoon, is in charge of its nightly activities.

A few miles away, the scout and pioneer platoons are holding a dance.  A Canadian orchestra beats out the music while the soldiers swing it with the farm girls of the countryside.  The colonel and a few of his officers hear Major D. L. Gordon, Toronto, lecture on artillery counter-battery work then jeep over to pay the men their compliments.

There you have the unexpected pleasure of meeting an old schoolmate, and a few of his mates of the platoon, Sgt. Ray Cormier, Halifax, and Pte. Edgar Paischand, Valmarie, Sask.

Smiths Falls Record News

War of 1812 – Bicentennial commemorated this year

Early settlement of the Ottawa Valley started with the disbanding of the British regiments after the war of 1812.  Since this is the bicentennial of the war of 1812, you might be interested in checking out a new and exciting site at www.thewarof1812.net.  This dynamic website has been developed by Peter Konieczny and Sandra Sadowski to spread the word about a conflict many Canadians know virtually nothing about.  According to Peter & Sandra, “their latest launch comes at a time when preserving history is becoming more and more challenging. With government funding being cut, universities scaling down programs, and historical sites disappearing, www.thewarof1812.net offers an important part of Canada’s past a whole new home.” 
Also, check out this book by local author, A. Barry Roberts, titled “For King and Canada.”  This is a detailed account of the story of the 100th Regiment of Foot during the war, and how they later became redcoat soldier-settlers in Goulbourn Township.

The Official War of 1812 Bicentennial Website at http://www.visit1812.com/  is fairly dry but does offer a list of the events planned from July through October to commemorate the war, ending the weekend of October 12-14 with “the largest battle reenactment in Canada to commemorate the Bicentennial! This major event will be held on the very battlefield on the very day where British and American forces faced off in the War of 1812’s first significant conflict. Hundreds of re-enactors will march from Fort George and take the field to recreate the momentous battle where a gallant leader was lost and history was made. There will be battlefield tours and educational programs at Queenston Heights Park all day Friday with evening fireworks showering the Niagara River from the American encampments in Lewiston. Saturday welcomes the major battle reenactment and commemorative service at Brock’s Monument with tours, period merchants, a lacrosse display match, music, and gala dinner at Queenston Heights. Fireworks will cap the off the day on the Heights as Brock’s body is solemnly led from the battlefield. On Sunday activities shift to Niagara-on-the-Lake where Brock’s funeral procession will move through the Town and his burial at Fort George will be recreated. Activities will also be ongoing all weekend in the Town of Lewiston, NY. This event is a joint endeavour through the efforts of the Niagara Parks Commission, Parks Canada, the Friends of Fort George, the Queenston Residents Association, and the Historical Association of Lewiston.”

Carleton Place Herald Advertisements pre-1850

Humor and Spice News Contained in Old Time Ads

Carleton Place Canadian, 27 February, 1958

By Howard M. Brown

 

Impressions of some of the varied local conditions of the earlier days of this district may be gained from the old time advertisements published in its newspapers.  A random selection of these will be taken as illustrations of the fading Ottawa Valley scene which was viewed from the nineteenth century newspaper office of the Carleton Place Herald.

Those which follow in the present column are advertisements and similar contributed announcements reproduced in abbreviated form from the Perth Courier, one of the first and the oldest of existing Ottawa Valley newspapers.

They are the period before the establishment of the Herald at Carleton Place.

Subscription Rates

The Bathurst Courier is printed and published in Perth, Upper Canada, every Friday morning by James Thompson.  Terms 15 shillings if paid in advance, 17s.6d. if not paid till the end of the year.  Postage included.  Produce taken in part payment.  Agents at Bytown, Pakenham, Richmond, Carleton Place, Horton, Lanark, Dalhousie, Sherbrooke, Smiths Falls and Merrick’s Mills.

September 18, 1835.

Flourishing Village

Staple and fancy dry goods, groceries, liquors-also for sale, a few first rate building lots in the flourishing village of Carleton Place. – W. & J. Bell, Perth, August 14, 1834.

Pioneer Pastor

Died, at his residence in Beckwith, Upper Canada, on September 12, 1835, the Reverend Doctor Buchanan in the 74th year of his age, and the 45th of his ministry.  He has left a widow and nine children to mourn his loss.

Temperance Convention

A convention of delegates of the Bathurst District Temperance Society was held in the Methodist Chapel, Carleton Place on February 23, 1836.  The Rev. William Bell was appointed chairman of the meeting and the Rev. T. C. Wilson, secretary.  The secretaries of the five societies whose delegates were present gave an account of the formation, constitution and present membership of their respective societies.  Memberships are Perth 511, Mississippi and Ramsay 295, Lanark 187, Richmond 57, and Franktown 18.  There are several other Temperance Societies in the District –

Thomas C. Wilson, secretary.

Credit Restricted

The subscribers having held a meeting at Carleton Place, Beckwith on March 10, 1838, herby notify the public that they have adopted the resolution of Carding Wool and Dressing Cloth, at their respective places of abode, for ready pay only.  The prices will be as low as the circumstances of the individual establishments will admit of, and merchantable produce shall be taken in payment at cash price.  Edward Bellamy, Ramsay; Elijah K. Boyce, Smiths Falls; Isaiah K. Boyce, Drummond; Silas Warner, Merrickville; James Rosamond, Carleton Place; Gavin Toshack, Ramsay.

Rapine and Bloodshed

To the inhabitants of the townships of Drummond, Lanark, Darling, Dalhousie, Bathurst and North and South Sherbrooke, comprising the First and Second Regiments of Lanark Militia.  Another attempt to invade these provinces is about to be made by numerous bands of lawless citizens of the United States, associated with disaffected persons who have left this country.

Rapine and bloodshed will mark the progress of these diabolical disturbers of our quiet homes.  Be ready to march to the frontier on a moment’s notice. – Wm. Morris, Col. Com’g, 2nd Lanark Regt., Alex McMillan, Col. Com’g, 1st Lanark Reg’t. Perth, 2nd November, 1838.

Beckwith Schools

Wanted immediately.  A common School Teacher for the Second Concession of Beckwith.  None need apply wh cannot give satisfactory reference as to character in every respect.  Apply to the Trustees or to the subscriber. – William Moore, Beckwith, 15 April, 1839.

Gentleman With a Cloak

A hint to Stage Drivers.  It would be well if stage drivers be more on their guard and first ascertain who they are giving passage to, and if such are their Own Masters!  Before they enter into a contract with them, or they may get into trouble.  On Thursday morning, the 11th instant, a gentleman with a cloak was quietly taken from our door, by the Brockville stage on his way to the land of liberty.  This was our newspaper boy, an Indentured Apprentice! – February 19, 1841.

Medical Card

Card. – Mr. William Wilson, surgeon, Licentiate in Midwifery and late of Glasgow University, begs to inform the inhabitants of Carleton Place and surrounding territory that, having come to reside among them, he has opened apartments in Mr. Rosamond’s building opposite the residence of R. Bell Esq., where he will be ready to wait upon or be consulted in any case requiring medical advice or interference.  He refers to the length of time he has resided in the country and the attention he has paid to those diseases peculiar to the climate. – Carleton Place, April 6, 1841.

Mountain Dew

To the Temperate – but not Teetotalers.  Malt whiskey for sale.  1,000 gallons of very superior malt whiskey is offered in quantities of not less than 3 gallons.  Merchants and Innkeepers will be supplied at the moderate rate of 4s.9d. per gal.  This whiskey is strongly recommended, being made by an experienced distiller, Mr. Peter McEwan, from the Braes of Breadalbane in the Highlands of Scotland, who in former years, with his drop of ‘mountain dew’ over his shoulder, played the game of hide-and-seek with the Gauger, with glorious success.

Having just got a new tub erected which will contain 1,400 gallons at a distilling, he hopes yet to enjoy a good share of public patronage, notwithstanding the progress of teetotalism – ‘go it, ye cripples!’ –

William Lock, Perth

April 29, 1841.

Pakenham School

A public meeting was held at Pakenham Village on June 16 in reference to the school of that village.  Mr. Andrew Russell presented regulations including the following to the consideration of the trustees, subscribers and others.

Hours of attendance from 10 to 4 with an interval of 15 minutes; and 5 minutes in the course of the former and 5 in the latter meeting.

The exercises of Saturday to consit of a repetition of the weekly lessons, with questions on the first principles of Christianity.

The school fund to be a pound per annum, with half a cord of wood or two and sixpence, the former payable in February and the latter on or before the 1st of December.

For purchasing maps and other classics apparatus, each subscriber shall advance an additional sixpence.

Pakenham, June, 1841.

Church Schism

We the undersigned elders and trustees of the Presbyterian Church in Ramsay in connection with the Church of Scotland beg leave to state –

 When two ministers styling themselves the Bytown Presbytry gave a notice of a Presbytry meeting, in a most illegal manner, to be held in the Ramsay Church to moderate in a call to Mr. McKid, while an appeal to the Synod was pending, the Church Trustees with the concurrence of the Session did the, to prevent that meeting only deliver the keys to Mr. Wylie as collateral security for the debt on the church property, with instructions to shut the door against the pretended Bytown Presbytry.  (signed) Andrew Toshack, Duncan Cram, elders; James Wylie, James Wilson, William Wilson, Robert Bell, John Gemmill, David Campbell, trustees. –

Ramsay, September 8, 1843.

Stolen Pocketbook

Stolen.  From the subscriber’s Great Coat pocket, in the Inn of John McEwen, Carleton Place, a large pocketbook, containing $18 in bills, promissory notes amounting to about 90 pounds, a small memorandum book and sundry other papers.  The notes were all payable to the order of the subscriber.   All the makers of the said notes are hereby cautioned not to settle with any other person presenting them for payment. –

Samuel Young, Carleton Place,

February 15, 1844.

Concert Ball

Mr. Archibald McArthur of Ramsay is induced to give a splendid Concert and Ball on Friday, April 4th in Mr. Peter Young’s barn, 8th line Ramsay, which will be fitted up expressly for the purpose.  He has acquired the valuable assistance of Mr. John McFarlane, the celebrated Musical Bell player;  Mr. Joseph Docherty of Ramsay, the Solo singer; Mr. John Brennon of Perth, the Clarinet player; also Mr. Peter Young, Ramsay, comic singer, whose powers are well known.  He has procured the valuable assistance of a Flute Band, and a number of other performers, along with your humble servant who will do all in his power to amuse them with the Patent Kent Key Bugle.

Tickets are 1s.6d. each, reserved seats 2s each; to be had of Mr. John Gemmill, merchant, Carleton Place.  Mr. Alex Snedden and Mr. David Leckie, Ramsay, also at the door on the night of the concert.  Performance to commence at 7 o’clock precisely. –

March 24, 1845.

Licenced Inns

Return of licences issued in the Bathurst District in the first half of the year, 1847:

Township of Beckwith Inn licences – Ann Burrows, Donald McFarlane, Archibald Gillis, Thomas Kidd, James Jackson.  Carleotn Place, Robert Mclaren, Manny Nowlan, Napoleon Lavallee.

Beckwith Shop licences, John A. Gemmill, Carleton Place.

Township of Ramsay Inn licences, James Coulter, Edward Houston, James McAllister, John Wright.

Stills, Bathurst District, Peter McArthur, Beckwith; Thomas Findlay, Lanark; Robert McLaren, Perth. –

Anthony Leslie, Inspector of Licences, Bathurst District.

Ploughing Match

Results of the Ploughing Match conducted by the Bathurst District Agricultural Society on the farm of William Walllace, 8th Line Ramsay, yesterday.  The judges James Wilkie, James Black and James Duncan, reported the following winners:

Old Ploughman’s Class – 1st, Lawrence Naismith, 2nd Robert Cowan (James Drynan’s man), 3rd Matthew Millions, 4th James Stewart.

Young Men’s Class – 1st Wm. Young (son of Peter Young), 2nd Robert Steele, 3rd Wm. Young (son of Robert Young), 4th Peter Cram.

Four prizes awarded in each of the two classes were in the amounts of 25s., 20s., 15s., and 10s.

James Bell, secretary, B.D.A.S., Carleton Place,

October 18, 1848.