Mississippi Mills – First & Second World War Casualties

New to the Carleton Place Public Library

Courtesy of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 240, Almonte, Ontario:

IMG-3

IMG-4

The Lost Generation of Mississippi Mills :WWI Casualties

Courtesy of the North Lanark Historical Society and the Town of Mississippi Mills:

IM3

Published in: on November 11, 2014 at 3:00 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: ,

Millions in Fight – 18 August, 1914

Carleton Place Herald, 18 August, 1914

 

History Has No Parallel For Impending Battle

FRONT IS 266 MILES LONG

 

Statement from French War Office Advises

Advises People to Expect No News

For Eight Days at Least – Great

Suspense Is Felt In Brussels –

Austrians Reported to Have

Invaded Northern Servia.

 

Paris, Aug. 17 – (C.A.P. Cabie). – The conditions under which the great battle between the Germains and the allied forces will probably be fought are made the subject of an official communication issued by the French Minister of War yesterday afternoon.  By the development and the nature of the ground over which the battle will be waged, the communication says, this vast engagement will differ profoundly from the battles of other times.

“By reason of the abandonment of the attack which the Germans planned against Nancy,” says the communication, “our concentration has been carried out with regularity and in its entirety, and thus the whole of the French army will battle with the whole of the German forces, with the exception of those German troops concentrated on the eastern frontier of the Empire.  The violation of the neutrality of Belgium has extended the Belgian and French lines to the frontier of Holland.  The next battle, therefore will be from Basle to Maastricht, with several millions of men on each side.”

For those who are interested, the rest of this article may be read on microfilm at the Carleton Place Public Library.  Just call ahead to reserve the microfilm machine – 613-257-2702.

 

D-DAY, June 6, 1944 : Report from The Carleton Place Canadian

IMG_0005

Allied Forces Land In France Tuesday Morning

From

The Carleton Place Canadian

June 8, 1944

 

“Long Awaited D-Day Arrives when Thousands of Troops

Consolidate Position in French Territory

 

By Michael O’Mara

Canadian Press Staff Writer

 

D-Day arrived Tuesday when British, American and Canadian troops landed on the Normandy coast of France and began what Gen. Eisenhower called a crusade in which “we will accept nothing less than full victory.”

 

Initial landings of the greatest amphibious assault in history were preceeded by Allied heavy bombings of the invasion coast and were accompanied by a mammoth air cover, 11,00 aircraft in all taking part in the operations.  Seaborne troops, headed by Gen. Montgomery surged across the Channel from England by 4,000 regular ships and additional thousands of smaller craft.

 

They were preceded by massed flights of parachute and glider forces who landed during the dark.  More than 640 naval guns, ranging from 4 to 16-inch, hurled many tons of shells accurately into coastal fortifications which the Germans had spent four years preparing against this invasion day.

 

Initial German opposition in all quarters was less than expected and as aresult Allied losses, in all quarters was less than expected and as a result Allied losses, in general, were much less than expected.  Losses of aircraft carring airborne troops was extremely small although the air-borne attack was on a very large scale.

 

A high officer at Allied headquarters described the landings as actually the third phase of the battle to crush Hitler, the first having been the gigantic air assault and the second the offensive in Italy.

 

At the same time word came from Moscow that the Russian army was massing in preparation for another great attack from the east as its part in defeating Germany.

 

The condition of the sea – the Channel was rough and there was a shower of rain at dawn on D-Day – caused some anxiety at supreme headquarters but the troops got ashore even though many were seasick.

 

Prime Minister Churchill told the British House of Commons on the day of the invasion that the operation was “undoubtedly the most complicated and difficult which has ever occurred.”

 

Lt.-Gen. H. D. G. Crerar, the Canadian Army commander, sent a personal message to Canadian assault forces on the eve of the invasion stating he has “complete confidence in our ability to meet the tests which lie ahead.”  He said the Canadians would have a vital part to play in the assault.

 

“Plans, preparations, methods and technique which will be employed are based on knowledge and experience bought and paid for by the 2nd Canadian Division at Dieppe,” the message said.

 

“The contribution of that hazardous operation cannot be overestimated.  It will prove to have been an essential prelude to our forthcoming and final success.”

 

Invasion of France was preceded by two days by the fall of Rome to Allied 5th Army units.  American and Canadian infantrymen and tanks, after being resisted strongly at the Eternal city’s outskirts by hand-fighting rearguards, were the first to enter Italy’s capital.

 

As the invasion of France progressed beyond its first day, field dispatches declared that the invaders were making excellent progress and were biting deep into France.  Allied invasion headquarters said only that satisfactory progress was being made but unofficial reports placed British, Canadian, and American invasion troops in possession of a 50 mile stretch of the French coast with the depth in some instances 12 miles or more.

 

Beachheads were reinforced during Tuesday night by airborne troops and from these operations came headquarters’ first announcement of losses suffered by the airborne section of the invasion.  It was stated that 12 big transport planes and 12 gliders were missing from the night’s operations which saw a 50 mile long train of transports and gliders soar across the Channel.

 

Ross Munro, Canadian War Correspondent, reported from France that in two hours and 45 minutes fighting Canadian troops won their beachhead Tuesday and then shoved on inland.  The strip of coast won by Canada’s soldiers was quite narrow but it provided a base for further penetration.”

 

IMG_0004

The following are excerpts from the June 1944 editions of The Carleton Place Canadian:

pic 3

 

IMG_0006

 pic 2

 

 

 pic 5

 

pic 1

pic 4

pic 6

Carleton Place War Memorial: “Our Honoured Dead”

Veteran’s Names on Left Side:

J. G. Bennett –  James Gordon Bennett, WW II

J. Borland – Joseph Borland, WW II               

D. C. Cameron – Duncan Cedric Cameron, WW II

W. A. Costello – Wilson Adison Costello, WW II

J. F. Cranston – James Francis Cranston, WW II

W. Camelon – Wilmer Camelon, WW II

F. Dray – Frederick Albert Dray (Ryan), WW II

B. H. Dunphy – Boyne Hogan Dunphy, WW II

G. A. Elliott –  G. A. Elliott, WW II

M. Fieldhouse – Maurice Fieldhouse, WW II

H. J. Findlay – Hugh John Findlay, WW II

L. G. Scott – Lloyd George Scott, WW II

M. Forbes – Harry Malcolm Forbes, WW II

A. D. Garland – Douglas Haig Armour Garland, WWII

C. G. S. Hughes – Cyril Garnet Strong Hughes, WW II

W. R. Hughes – William Robert Hughes, WW II

R. D. Irvine – Robert David Irvine, WW II

R. G. James – Russell George James, WW II

F. E. Lancaster – Earl  Franklin Lancaster, WW II

G. Lewis – Gerald Lewis, WW II                    

W. Loney – William Melville Loney, WW II

D. C. Maxwell – David Chester Maxwell, WW II

F. Cavers – Robert Franklin Cavers, WW II

H. Murfitt – Harold Murfitt, WW II

Veteran’s Names on Right Side:

G. E. Morris – George Ernest Morris, WW II

R. E. McFarlane – Ross Edward McFarlane, WW II

J. H. McKittrick  – James Herbert McKittrick, WW II

R. J. O’Leary – Robert Joseph O’Leary, WW II

K. O’Meara – Kenneth Orval O’Meara, WW II

L. Patterson – Lorne Patterson, WW II

E. E. Porteous – Earl Ernest Porteous, WW I

W. A. Porterfield – Wilbert Andrew Porterfield, WW II

A. E. Prendergast –  Albert Edward Prendergast, WW II

A. E. Prime – Arthur Esmond Prime, WW II

J. W. Pye – James William Pye, WW II

W. H. Porter – William Henry Porter, WW II

E. E. Rathwell  – Edward Earl Rathwell, WW II

W. C. J. Reynolds – William Cyril Jeffrey Reynolds, WW II

H. S. Savage – Francis Herbert Savage, WW II

R. S. Stanzel – Ross Samuel Stanzel, WW II

H. Stark – Horace Garner Stark, WW II

H. A. Stokes – Harold Allan Stokes, WW II

D. A. Turner  – Dalton Arnold Turner, WW II

W. A. Valley – William Allen Valley, WW II

J. S. Warren –  James Snedden Warren, WW II

R. W. White – Raymond Wilbert White, WW II

B. Foxton – 1952 Korea

Veteran’s Names, Middle:

L. Campbell – William Lockhard Campbell, WW I

R. Borland –  Robert John Borland, WW 1

J. Hamilton –  John (aka Joseph) Hamilton, WW 1

N. McPhee – Neil John McPhee, WW 1

A. Simons – Arthur John Simons, WW 1

T. Cummings – Thomas Cummings, WW 1

H. Eastwood – Herbert John Eastwood, WW 1

R. Flegg – Thomas Reynolds Flegg, WW 1

H. McDiarmid – Harold William McDiarmid, WW 1

V. McDiarmid – Victor Lionel McDiarmid, WW 1

A. McDiarmid – Eugene Arthur McDiarmid, WW 1

W. J. Griffith – William John Griffith, WW 1

D. O’Donovan – Daniel O’Donovan, WW 1

C. O’Donovan – Cornelius O’Donovan, WW 1

P. Moore – Percy Moore, WW 1

L. Corr – John Leo Corr, WW 1

A. Robertson – Herbert Arnold Robertson, WW 1

S. Hamilton – Sydney Hamilton, WW 1

F. Fumerton – Frank Fumerton, WW 1

G. Fanning – George Davis Fanning, WW 1

Rev. J. H. Christie – Rev. John H. H. Christie, WW 1

E. Hockenhull – Joseph Edward Hockenhull, WW 1

A. McCaw – Archibald McMorine McCaw, WW 1

A. McPhee – A. McPhee, WW 1

W. Fraser – William Fraser, WW 1

P. Hughes – Percy Grenville Hughes, WW 1

W. Lewis – Walter Lewis, WW 1

J. R. Riddell – James Ross Riddell, WW 1

N. R. McPhail – Norman McPhail, WW 1

C. Reynolds -Thomas Reynolds, WW 1

F. Trotman – Frederick Gilbert Trotman, WW 1

W. Wright – William John Wright, WW 1

Wm. Tyre – William Tyrie, WW 1

C. Bryce – Cecil Elmas Bryce, WW 1

H. Dowdall – Herbert Dowdall, WW 1

A. Tufts – Arthur Zimmerman Tufts, WW 1

S. T. Edwards – Sterne Tighe Edwards, WW 1

F. Murphy – Frances Michael Murphy, WW 1

J. H. Brown – John Horace Brown, WW 1

R. Simpson – Ralph Patterson Simpson, WW 1

W. Peever – Wesley Albert Peever, WW 1

A. Moffatt – Allan Clyde Moffatt, WW 1

R. Kellough – William Roy Kellough, WW 1

H. Utman – Henry Utman, WW 1

D. C. Humphrey – David Charles Humphrey, WW 1

A. Houston – Arthur Norman Houston, WW 1.

R. E. McEachen – Rebecca Ellen McEachen, WW 1.

Carleton Place War Memorial, 2012

Carleton Place War Memorial, 2012

SHARING MEMORIES, WEEK SEVEN

THE LAST TRAIN

It’s just a matter of time before the last train whistle blows in Carleton Place.  The end of an era is at hand, and the following is an historical retrospective of how the railway affected the economic and cultural development of Carleton Place.

One hundred and fifty-nine years ago, James C. Poole, editor of the Carleton Place Herald, announced the coming of the railroad in the July 21st, 1853 edition of his newspaper:

“We rejoice to be able to announce that the By-law of the County Council, loaning the credit of the County to the Brockville and Ottawa Railway Company, has been heartily supported by the people in the different municipalities. 

The inhabitants of this ‘city’, elated at the success which had attended the railroad scheme thus far, turned out en masse and had a regular rejoicing.

The windows were illuminated.  The old cannon was placed on the bridge and several shots fired by ways of introduction.  The party formed a procession, led by the music of two drums and the Highland Bagpipes, with several flags floating in the breeze, and marched round the town.  It stopped occasionally to let off some pent up gas in the shape of hearty cheers for Jackson & Company, the Brockville & Ottawa Railway Company, the Directors, the County Council, the Press, and several private individuals whose efforts were not wanting in bringing about the final results.  About 9 o’clock the demonstration was wound up by several tremendous shots from the cannon, accompanied by a number of smaller guns, after which all went quietly to their homes.”

With the advent of the railway, and the establishment of industries like Findlay Foundry, Carleton Place saw major expansion in the 1860’s. Some ads in the Carleton Place Herald of 1859 reveal the sudden realization by local merchants and men of industry of the commercial advantages of using rail service to both obtain and deliver their goods:

“First Arrival by Railway Direct to Carleton Place!  Teas, Teas, part of the Cargo of the Ship ‘Gauntlet’, from China, 112 Boxes and 48 Catties – Also a large stock of Harvest Tools – Also by the same conveyance a further supply of fancy and staple Dry Goods and a very full assortment of Shelf Hardware, Crockery, etc. – A. McArthur, June 30, 1859.”

Beginning in 1859 with a railway link established between Brockville and Carleton Place, and again in 1870 with a link from Ottawa, the town and surrounding area was becoming an attractive and cheap recreational destination:

“Cheap Excursion to Brockville on Thursday August 25th.  Fare from Almonte, Carleton Place, Franktown, and back, only One Dollar! Leave Almonte 7:30 a.m., Carleton Place 8:00 a.m., Smiths Falls 9:15 a.m., arriving at Brockville 11 a.m. Returning will leave Brockville at 4:45 p.m., reaching Almonte at 8 p.m. – Robert Watson, Managing Director, Brockville & Ottawa Railway, Brockville, August 16, 1859.”

Several years later, in response to the possibility of war between the British and American governments, the Carleton Place Rifle Company was formed.  On June 3rd, 1866, the Company was called upon to help defend the riverfront and railway communications at Brockville from Fenian raiders.  According to Captain James Poole’s newspaper report: 

“After having been on the alert for about twenty-four hours awaiting an order to proceed to the frontier, a hurried dispatch was received about midnight on Sunday that the volunteer companies of Carleton Place and Almonte should be ready in about an hour to repair to Brockville by a special train……It was a solemn and moving sight, the moonlight giving a dim view of the outline of the ranks and the friends and relatives moving to and fro as they took leave of those near and dear to them, discharging their duty to defend our hearths and homes against the invasion of a lawless band of marauders.  As the train left the station three hearty cheers from the citizens rang the air, lustily reechoed by the true men whom we hope to welcome soon again.”

More wars followed, with the train station once again becoming the arena of emotional departures and farewells:

“The August 1914 civic farewell to the town’s first dozen war volunteers under Captain W. H. Hooper was attended at the railway station by hundreds of citizens and the town officials and two bands, with choruses of Auld Lang Syne joining the noise of the departing train of Lanark and Renfrew county volunteers.”

Founded Upon A Rock by Howard Morton Brown.

It’s easy to understand how the train became integral to the uniting & defending of the country, as well as contributing to the monetary and cultural prosperity of every community it travelled through.  Carleton Place was no exception, and benefited greatly from it stopping here, for about 130 years.

As well, as evidenced in most of Mr. Poole’s newspaper stories about the railway, there has always been an emotional impact associated with the railway, or more specifically, with the coming and going of loved ones on the train.  After all, many people used the train to leave Carleton Place permanently, some as part of the great economic migration of the 1870’s, others due to the ultimate sacrifice of war.   

The love affair with trains in this community continued unabated until the late 1980’s, when it was no longer economically feasible to retain the line running between Ottawa and Carleton Place, at which time the tracks were torn out, making the disconnection final. Only the north-south CPR tracks remain, and even though no trains on that line stop here either, the familiar whistle blowing and clickity-clack of trains on track have allowed us to pretend that the railway is still important to Carleton Place.

And now, for the great departure.  No more trains.  No more train whistles.  No more illusions.  All aboard!  It’s the end of the line for Carleton Place.

If you have any memories about the trains that run through Carleton Place, now would be a good time to write them down so that future generations will know what the time of trains was like for people in this community.

CPR Tracks – September 2012

SHARING MEMORIES, WEEK FIVE

As October is Canadian Women’s History month, I thought it would be interesting to write about a woman born & schooled in the Carleton Place area, who went ahead to make a significant contribution to the world.

Margaret Verne McNeely was such person.  Born in Beckwith Township, Lanark County on 13 August 1885, she was the daughter of James McNeely (1860-1948) and Margaret Jane Duff (1863-1930).  After completing her education at local schools in Beckwith and Carleton Place, she attended and graduated from University College at the University of Toronto in 1908.  In 1909 she became a missionary of The Presbyterian Church in Canada to China.

According to Ontario’s Archival Information Network, “from 1909 to 1914, supported by the Women’s Missionary Society, Verne assisted Rev. Donald MacGillivray of the North Honan Mission with compiling and editing the China Mission Year Book published by the Christian Literature Society.  From 1914 to 1917, Verne worked with the China Continuation Committee which developed into the National Christian Council of China.  In 1917 Verne accepted an invitation to work in a bookstore in Shanghai that specialized in the sale of English and Chinese books.  This bookstore eventually became the Kwang Hsueh Publishing House which had, by 1943, about one-third of its business in Chinese textbooks sponsored by the Nurses’ Association of China.  In 1923 Verne became the manager of the bookstore until the onset of the Second World War during which she spent two and a half years in a Japanese interment centre.  After the war she made her way to Nanking to assist the Secretary of the Nurses’ Association of China but returned to Canada in 1950, and made her home in Toronto, Ontario.”

Margaret Verne McNeely passed away on 28 Dec 1975 in Newmarket, Ontario, at the age of 90.

Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Regiment

 

Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Dot Village With Local Names

From the Carleton Place Canadian, 04 January, 1945

Originally from The Smiths Falls Record News

 

An Italian Village – The Canadian Lanark and Renfrew Scottish are resting and training in this village for the day and will bring new Italian battles.  Their colonel, from Medicine Hat, Alta., says his men are scattered over three villages and three hills, but here is the greatest concentration of them all.

The village is one of story and atmosphere.  It stands on a hill and atop the hill is a great and decaying castle, built by the blue-blooded Maletesta family in the 1300’s as a bulwark against transgression on its Adriatic domain.  Below, the village clings to itself, its sturdy stone houses parted by the tight, cobbled streets filled now with the vehicles of modern war and peopled with a contented human amalgam of men from Victoria and Red Deer, Alta., and somewhere in Nova Scotia, of a few hundred refugees from Rimni and the districts around there and a few hundred more of the normal population.

Here you see a farmer guiding his oxen and cart down the hill to his farm.  There you see the village priest hurrying home.  The Roman Catholic soldiers attend his services each Sunday in the village church.  Here you see a plaque commemorating the dead of the last war.  In front of it hangs an ornate lamp, like something out of a Christmas card of old England.  A few feet away is a plaque to the dead of the Ethiopian war.  Its names have been obliterated by a black smudge authored by someone, sometime.

The Scottish have marked the village liberally with the names common in their new parent region, the Ottawa Valley.  Here is Lanark avenue, there O’Brien’s theatre where Italians and Canadians watch the shows together, here Lennox Lunch (the men’s kitchen), Pembroke Hotel (officers’ mess), there Beamish Stores (the quartermasters’ stores).

Over one door hangs a sign “Royal Bank of Canada.”  Inside Capt. G. L. Matthews, Ottawa, the paymaster, and his sergeant, Frank Rigley, of Verdun, Que., hold down “the warmest spot in town.”  Reading the Montreal Standard over the heat of their little oil stove is Pte. W. N. Barrington, Verdun, Que.

Rigley talks of the excellent feelings between the Canadians and Italians:  “This is the best place we’ve struck yet.  Leave out our clothes and they’ll wash them, press them and have them back in a hurry.  We gave the mother (of the family sharing the house with them) a suit of underwear for the old man yesterday and she nearly fell on her knees thanking us.”

Outside again you meet Capt. R. P. Neil, who has found two others from Pembroke, where “A” company of the Lanark and Renfrew hails from.  They are Ptes. Huntley Munro and Michael Gregg.  In Adanac Inn, the little hole in the wall that is the dry canteen, you meet Auxiliary Services Officer Michael Quinn from Perth, Ont., the regiment’s home town.

From this village and from two others – the troops have called them Smiths Falls and Carleton Place – the battalion sends its men on seven-day leaves to Rome and Florence, 48’s to a leave town on the coast, and also sends them out to train and keep tough in the neighbouring countryside.

On the outskirts, near a little hillside graveyard for the British soldiers who died fighting here, is “Tartan Dive” where the men rally at night to have a drink of wine and listen to the Italian orchestra and chew the fat.  It used to be a Fascist recreation room.  Now Sgt. Harry Jantz, of Saskatoon, is in charge of its nightly activities.

A few miles away, the scout and pioneer platoons are holding a dance.  A Canadian orchestra beats out the music while the soldiers swing it with the farm girls of the countryside.  The colonel and a few of his officers hear Major D. L. Gordon, Toronto, lecture on artillery counter-battery work then jeep over to pay the men their compliments.

There you have the unexpected pleasure of meeting an old schoolmate, and a few of his mates of the platoon, Sgt. Ray Cormier, Halifax, and Pte. Edgar Paischand, Valmarie, Sask.

Smiths Falls Record News

Story of The Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Regiment, by Howard Morton Brown, 14 Sept. 1961

Some 13 years ago The Canadian prepared an article on the history of the Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Regiment which has a company stationed at Carleton Place.  Here is the story recalled.

Lanark and Renfrew Regiment, July 22, 1948

Glorious pages of history, full of stirring accounts of hard fought battles on the field of honor, of meritorious commendation for efficiency and service, could be unfolded if the complete history on the Lanark and Renfrew, Scottish Regiment, was available.

One of Canada’s oldest and most famous military units at present under command of Lieut. Col. W. K. McGregor, Pembroke, the regiment, since organization in 1862 as a volunteer militia company has aided in the suppression of the Fenian Raids of 1886, contributed 2,956 men to the Canadian Expeditionary Force in the Great War, won five battle honors, and finally recruited 73 officers and over 2,000 men who served in active units in the present war.  How the regiment was organized is told in an abridged copy of its activities which have been notated from time to time through the years.

Early settlement of the Ottawa Valley started with the disbanding of the British regiments after the war of 1812.  Conditions in England and Scotland at this time were such that men discharged from the army were unable to find employment and so came to Canada.

Although the 42nd Brockville battalion of infantry (the “Old 42nd”) as it was formerly known, was not formed until 1866, the early settlers belonged to several units which were established at that time.  The Militia Act of 1855 authorized the formation of volunteer militia companies and the following were formed in Lanark and Renfrew counties :   Infantry company at Almonte, Dec. 5, 1862 ; at Brockville, Dec. 11, 1862 ; at Perth and Fitzroy, Jan. 16, 1863 ; at Lansdowne, June 15, 1866 ;  and Smiths Falls, June 22, 1866.

Units Are Concentrated

On October 5, 1866, these independent units were concentrated into one unit “the 42nd Brockville Battalion of Infantry.”  When the regimental command was given to Lieut. Col. Jacob D. Buell in the same year, the unit became known as the Lanark and Renfrew Regiment.  Another unit, an infantry company at Pembroke, was attached and absorbed as No. 7 company in 1871.

In 1866, the militia received training under active service conditions.  When the threat of Fenian raids assumed serious proportions in 1870, contingents from the companies stationed in the two counties were detailed for duty at Brockville, Prescott, Cornwall and along the shores of the St. Lawrence River.  In the same year, a small detachment led by Capt. Thomas Scott, was sent with the Red River Expedition to the Canadian West to help crush the Riel Rebellion.

Drill sheds (as they were then called) were under construction for the battalion in 1868 at Lansdowne, Almonte, Carleton Place, Smiths Falls and Perth.

During the succeeding five years, activities of the unit were comparatively quiet although it is said the camp of 1875, was the first “dry” one since its formation.  The original historian facetiously remarks on this point.  “The matter has since been rectified and great improvement noted in the orderly conduct of the men.”  In 1877, the Pembroke company commanded by Lieut. Moffatt was called out to aid the local civil authorities in repressing riotous raftsmen.  This occurred during the great lumbering days.

Col. Buell retired in 1896, after 20 years continuous service and was succeeded by Lieut. Co. Arthur J. Matheson.  The new commanding officer approached his task under difficult circumstances as many of the officers had reached the age of retirement, but under his direction, the regiment was able to go to camp near Prescott with a strength of 15 officers and 185 other ranks.  It is noteworthy the regiment was highly complimented on its showing during an inspection. 

For the next nine years, training was reduced to a minimum due to a reduction in militia grants but the battalion was kept together through voluntary training at local headquarters.  A brief scare in 1895 due to differences between Great Britain and America over the Venezuela boundary, (which was finally settled by arbitration) helped arouse interest in the militia and the strengthening of Canadian defences.

In 1898, Lieut. Col. J. McKay succeeded Col Matheson.  Three years later he in turn was succeeded by Lieut. Col. Lennox Irving.  During his tenure of office the 42nd was selected the rural unit to take part in the ceremony and review on the occasion of the visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of York.  After the march past, General Otter addresses the regiment stating, “Well done 42nd.  It was simply splendid.”

In 1906, Lieut. Col. H. J. Mackie succeeded to the command.  During his tenure of office an amusing incident took place at the camp.

Lost Spur is Found

One of the staff officers was fond of brilliant dress.  He wore a pair of brilliant golden spurs.  One day camp orders reported the loss of a spur.  A soldier found it and brought it to the Orderly Room.  The unit, through exercises for the day, was immediately called out and a stretcher party of four men was detailed to carry the spur.  An armed guard was detailed to accompany the party.  With the regimental band leading the parade, the unit proceeded to headquarters.  The story concludes at this point.

Lieut. Col. J. M. Balderson succeeded Col. Mackie in 1908 and he remained in command until 1920.

During the Great War, the regiment enlisted and transferred men to the Canadian Expeditionary Force as follows:  First contingent, 150 ; 21st Battalion, 120 ; 38th Battalion, 285 ; 77th Battalion, 103 ; 80th Battalion, 321 ; 130th Battalion, 1,024 ; and the 240th Battalion, 963.  The 130th Lanark and Renfrew Overseas Battalion was mobilized Nov. 14, 1915, at Perth, under Lieut. Col. J. E. de Hertel, and the 240th, on June 1, 1916, at Renfrew under Lieut. Col. E. Watt.

Battle honors awarded to the regiment were, the Somme, 1916 ; Amiens, in the same year ; Arras, 1917-18, (Hindenburg Line) ; Ypres, 1917, and the pursuit to Mons in the same year.

The unit was re-organized in 1922 and Lieut. Col. J. R. Caldwell succeeded to the command.  Companies were allocated as follows : Headquarters, Perth ; “A” Company, Pembroke ; “B” Company, Renfrew and Arnprior ; “C” Company, Carleton Place, and “D” Company, Perth.

Two years after Lieut. Col. J. A. Hope, D.S.O., M.C., V.D., was given the command in 1925, the name of the regiment was changed to the Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Regiment and became affiliated with the famous Black Watch regiment.  During his term of office, headquarters of the battalion was at Perth, on the Tay River.  In Scotland, a Lieut. Col. Hope commanded the 42nd Regiment of the Black Watch.  His headquarters was also at Perth, on the Tay.

The colors were presented to the battalion at Barriefield, July 13, 1930, by Miss Constance M. Dawes, and the ceremony of dedication took place the same afternoon.  Hon. Major H. H. Bedford Jones, D.D., officiated at the dedication.

A few years later, Col. Hope commanded the Bisley rifle team.  He was succeeded in 1931 by Lieut. Col. E. H. Wilson, V.D., who remained in command until 1933 when Lieut. Col. P. H. Gardner, M.C., V.D., was appointed commanding officer.

During his tenure of office, the regiment resumed training at Petawawa Military Camp for the first time since the war years.  He had the honor of being present at the Coronation of King George VI.

In 1938, the present commander, Col. Beatty, succeeded Col. Gardner.  During this visit of the King and Queen in 1939, his regiment was given a prominent part in the ceremonies at Ottawa and Kingston.

Aids at Ottawa Function

At Ottawa the regiment was credited with preventing what might have developed into a serious situation on the evening Their Majesties attended a parliamentary dinner at the Chateau Laurier.  Over 300 strong, the battalion’s duty was to line Mackenzie avenue and control the traffic and crowds.  About eight o’clock, the crowd began to press forward and civilian “casualties” occurred right and left.  The situation rapidly got out of hand.  But the pipe band was brought forward and played in front of the Chateau.  Soon the temper of the crowd changed and the situation was under control.

A personal bodyguard for the Queen was selected from the unit and stationed in the hall leading to the East Block of the Parliament Buildings.  It was commanded by Capt. A. Wallace.

At the outbreak of the present war, guards were established for a time at each armory, and shortly afterward the regiment was required to detail a guard of two officers and 50 other ranks over the Magazine, Pump House, and Main Gate at Petawawa camp. 

The regiment provided a guard over aliens interned at Centre Lake, in December, 1939.  Within a short time, a complete company of 250 officers and men were supplied to the Governor General’s Footguards, under command of Major Harold Baker.

Appointments announced in 1943 were : D. E. Jamieson, Smiths Falls, and now of Pembroke, will shortly receive his commission and will be appointed adjutant.  Lieut. W. R. Eliott, Renfrew, is training officer.  The following N.C.O.’s will be appointed assistant instructors with the rank of warrant Officer H, Sgt. Major J. B. Rouselle, Headquarters Company, Renfrew ; C.Q.M.S.P.J. Rooney “B” Company, Almonte ; C.Q.M.S.C.A. Clarke, “C” Company, Smiths Falls, and Sgt. L. E. Fagan, “D” Company, Carleton Place.

The spring of 1946 marked a turning point in the history of this famous regiment as it came under the scrutiny of the Department of National Defense under new plans announced for the Canadian Army in the post-war period.

The regiment was placed under command of Col. William Boyd, of Smiths Falls, who succeeded Major Alex Bathgate, of Pembroke, who was in command for a short time after Lieut. Col John McLaren Beatty.  A short time later, Col. W. K. McGregor, of Pembroke, succeeded Col. Boyd.

The regiment became known as the 59th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Lanark and Renfrew Scottish (Reserve).  Instead of the old time companies in an infantary regiment, the unit was divided into artillery batteries.

The 176th Battery was subdivided into two troops.  “A” Troop is located at Perth under Capt. W. Arbuthnot ; “B” Troop at Smiths Falls under Capt. Gordon Thom.  Headquarters is at Carleton Place under Major C. R. Ryan who commands both troops.

The 17th Battery is located at Renfrew and the 177th Battery at Pembroke.

In command of Headquarters in Carleton Place for the 176th Battery are : Major Ryan, Lieuts. G. W. Comba, Ivan Romanuke, Ronald McFarlane, M.B.E., John Dunlop ; Battery Sergeant Major E. M. Evoy, M. M. and Bar, Battery Quarter Master Sergeant, W. E. Fraser ; sergeants H. Neil, Thomas Poynter and Transport Sergeant Thomas Leach.

The first post-war camp was held at Point Petre that year.  The camp is located on Prince Edward Island, near Picton.  A considerable number from this area attended and were introduced to the new equipment allotted the regiment.  This included the main weapons, the 40-mm. Bofors gun and the 20-mm. Polsten rapid-fire gun.

The following year, the next camp was held at the Royal Canadian School of Artillery (L.) at Picton on the site of the former airport.  More advanced training was given and as a result of the men’s progress, the regiment was complimented on its showing.

At this camp, guns were fired at Point Petre.

During the winter of 1947, considerable training took place at various troop headquarters.  Carleton Place made use of the 40-mm. Fofors, gun tractor and 15-cwt. Transport allotted to them.  Many lectures were given and some schemes were completed.  The year 1948 saw a repetition of previous training at the artillery school during the annual camp, just completed.